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Quisiéramos Ver a Jesús

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“Señor, quisiéramos ver a Jesús” (“Sir, we wish to see Jesus”), is the inscription on the podium in the church here at Familia Feliz. In John 12:21, Greek men came to a festival and approached Jesus’ disciples with this request. The simple, straightforward expression of their desire encapsulates the longing of every human heart — conscious or subconscious: we want to see Jesus. Sometimes we see Him, other times people see Him in us. Seeing Jesus “This has been the best week I’ve had since being here!” I thought the second Sabbath of this month. Everything seemed to go right, my heart was content. I realized that I had prayed at the beginning of the week for God to help me spend more time with Him so that I can have Him to share. And that extra time seemed to make all the difference in every facet! Feeling useful as a co-parent brings great satisfaction. With my older girls being gone for Pathfinder camporee, I ended up making suppers for poor Mariana (who isn’t old enough to know what

Miracle Junkie

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Some people are adrenaline junkies. They live life right on the other side of, “Well, this was a bad idea,” and can’t seem to stop chasing the thrill of almost dying prematurely. These people are often the ones addicted to having a crazy story to tell. And they enjoy milking their epinephrine-soaked memories for all they’re worth. But me…I’ve figured out what I am: a miracle junkie. As much as I love a good thrill, I’m even more obsessed with finding little ways God has involved Himself and answered prayers.  Milagros con Las Lilas “Lord, I need words!” was my quick mental prayer. “A story, Teacher!” my girls had begged before bed. “Where in the Bible?” I asked. “¡Apocalipsis 12!” Revelation. It’s one thing to read it to them but another to explain! (I grin as I write this because that night just a couple weeks in; I had proof that God is the God of languages. He can give someone like me, who is very slow to formulate sentences, especially then, a rapid flow of comprehendible words!) S

Lice Combs

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“May this [ivory] tusk root out the lice of the hair and the beard.”  These are the words of the first written Canaanite sentence ever found. Southern archaeology students unearthed an incredible piece of history at Tel Lachish in 2016 with Dr. Hasel: an ivory lice comb with this plea inscribed. This discovery is just being published, ironically corresponding with the only time in my life that I’ll use a lice comb daily , be it on my head or a little girl’s. “ Piojos haunted the heads of people in 1700 BC,” I mused, having just completed brushing out Nirza’s little biting friends. “I guess I never thought about that.” How many parts of the lives of Bible characters do we not even think to think about? Like how they dealt with lice! Equally, how many parts of the lives of other people do we not even stop to wonder about? How many normal aspects of life in other places are not even on our radar? Like knowing you’ll never completely lice-free! Lice: Full Disclosures Full disclosure: I d

Potatoes

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Potatoes originated in Incan South America and have become the world's fourth largest crop (source: random Google search) . And it’s no wonder! Potatoes are amazingly versatile, easy to grow, cheap, and filling. And potatoes also carry symbolism, be it in commonly-used idioms or in events attached to these root vegetables. The Meat and Potatoes To me, potatoes have become a symbol of people caring. The meat and potatoes of missions is service, and I’ve experienced that service extending from one volunteer to another so many times! Teacher Abi sliced a potato into a container of water the minute I told her I was sick again, this time with a fever and body aches. “Teacher,” she said, “ponlos en tus axilas y en tu vientre para que tu cuerpo se sienta mejor” (“put these in your armpits and on your belly to make your body feel better”). It was kinda comedic as I laid in bed with a row of potato wedges on my stomach and in my armpits, and I don’t know how truly effective this Bolivian re